GrubHub Alternative?

As new mobile and web applications change the way we interact with food, The Foodery is looking at new ways to make local, organic meals available to Boston consumers through delivery services. Customers make a weekly order of meals that arrive a few days later, ready to refrigerate. With a focus on local, organic, and sustainable agriculture, these meals are a little different than your average GrubHub order and  probably a lot healthier, too. While the meals, at around $18 per person per meal, are probably more expensive than your average takeout order, they may not be more expensive than restaurant meals.

weight-loss

As an avid Foodler user, the convenience of being able to open a smartphone app and quickly and efficiently order local foods is unparalleled. My only complaint is not having enough healthy take out options. As a consumer I would be willing to pay a premium to enjoy locally grown, sustainable and potentially much healthier food. In order to stay competitive within the changing market place, these online food ordering services should begin to explore the possibility of partnering with services like The Foodery.

It’s interesting to see the ways that our access to ever-improving and changing types of technology can start to challenge traditional ideas like the “take-out menu” or “fast food” with healthier options that support local farmers more than national restaurant chains. While The Foodery might not exactly be competition for GrubHub now, it’s great to see ideas like this enter the convenience/delivery arena.

I’m really interested to see the way that technology, and particularly mobile technology, continue to change the way we access food. Already there are some apps that are challenging the traditional ideas about access to restaurants. We’re all familiar with the line to get into a fabulous restaurant on a Saturday night and with the process of trying to make reservations at a small and trendy new spot. Apps and websites like OpenTable.com and NoWait allow us to follow that same strategy in a slightly more convenient way, but allowing us to make reservations or get in line at a restaurant faster and easier ways.

But some new websites and apps are challenging even the ideas of lines and reservations. Apps like KillerRezzy, ReservationHop, and Zurvu work by purchasing reservations at trendy restaurants ahead of time, and then selling those reservations back to consumers. While these increase our access to fine dining, they sometimes do so at the expense of dining democracy, allowing privilege and money to edge in.

Other apps approach food access with a slightly more equalizing perspective, including apps like Locavore, which allows users to quickly and easily find farmers’ markets and farms that sell seasonal, locally grown food.

It’s so interesting to watch how these tools of technology are changing the way we access food, think about food, and build relationships with food.