Vote with Your Fork Rally

This month’s Let’s Talk About Food festival kicks off with the Vote With Your Fork Rally on the 26th at Trinity Church in Boston. There will be speakers on hand to talk about why voters should look at food and farming platforms for candidates when casting votes.

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The scheduled speakers include Chef Barton Seaver (Director of the Healthy and Sustainable Food Program at Harvard University’s School of Public Health), award winning chef Michel Nischan, Representative Chellie Pingree and Ken Cook the president and co-founder of Environmental Working Group (EWG).

Michel Nischan was recently interviewed as part of the National Geographics’ Future of Food series where he talked a bit about the importance of using our collective buying power, as consumers, not just to make healthier choices for ourselves, but also to improve our local economies. Someone made a comment on the interview about the cost of produce at local farmer’s markets still being too costly in comparison to the cost of produce in commercial venues. I thought it was interesting that Michel Nischan had actually addressed this point somewhat in his interview, where he is, I think, calling for a shift away from thinking about the cost of buying the “product” towards thinking about the cost of buying the seeds/plants and growing our own food in individual or community settings.

Personally I find the quality and longevity of the farmers market products to be far more reliable than to those of a traditional supermarket. I have also noticed an uptick in the individuals using government assistance at local farmers markets. Within Massachusetts EBT/SNAP benefits can be used at farmers markets throughout the states.

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Nationally the WIC Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program is helping to expand this benefit. These programs are helping to provide healthy food choices to families who may be experiencing food insecurities. I’m looking forward to hearing this year’s Vote With Your Folk speakers address these issues further.

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The purpose of this blog.

I grew up eating food from nearby farms and our large garden, but when I moved to the city I was happily exposed to all sorts of different flavors, cultures, and ethnic cuisines. Over time, I became interested in how these foods arrived to the stores and restaurants that I frequented. Through this blog, I will be exploring how food production, transportation and consumption has an impact on a city’s health, sustainability, and culture. I’m specifically interested in how social media is used to help food producers, restaurateurs, stores owners, and consumers communicate and change the current food production and consumption climate.

I love that food production and food sourcing is becoming a very big topic. People use sites like Twitter, Yelp, and Urban Spoon to talk about their foods, and to advocate for closer relationships between farm and plate. Before social media these voices weren’t well heard, but now anyone can talk directly to a farm or a restaurateur and ask about their ingredients. This has lead to a lot of new food movements, such as slow food and farm to plate.

For instance, check out this new restaurant I just dined at while visiting Seattle:

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The Walrus and the Carpenter

All of their food is locally sourced, and even the farms producing the ingredients are specifically listed on their website! This is what gets me excited about the use of social media and it’s ability to have a direct impact on informed choice.