A Look At GMOs

There is a lot of discussion in the news about GMOs – organisms whose genomes were modified using DNA recombination.  Those who have a strong opinion on the matter tend to argue that GMOs are unnatural to nature, unhealthy to humans, and should not be part of our modern diet. While these arguments may have merit under certain circumstances, taken as a whole I do not believe that GMOs are a threat. In fact, I believe that GMOs can hold the key to bringing freshness, flavor, and supply to our food markets.

For the last 10,000-13,000 years, the only way for food cultivators to introduce a desired trait into a plant organism was to crossbreed sexually compatible species and hope for a positive outcome. Generally, this was a very positive strategy – we’ve created many species of food items which maximize edible parts, minimize useless parts, and confer characteristics that make agriculture easy.

Top: A cultivated, modern banana. Bottom: A “wild” banana, the kind you’d encounter before agriculture.

However, crossbreeding is a very imprecise act and desired outcomes often require scores of generations. DNA recombination sidesteps this process by allowing desired genes to be transferred with pinpoint accuracy. The most typical traits that are inserted into food species confer herbicide tolerance, resistance to pests, and resistance to viruses.  The basic idea is the GMOs can be grown in the absence or reduction of harmful farming techniques (i.e. pesticides, tilling, fungicides, virucide, etc.).

Anti-GMO activists tend to argue that these desirable traits can have undesirable consequences, ranging from unintended cross-breeding to serious health effects. Some of these claims are true but disingenuous: though unintended cross-breeding is a concern, it is not solely relegated to GMOs – all newly introduces organisms pose the risk. Other claims are patently false: there is no scientific evidence to suggest that GMOs cause generic illnesses. These and other unsubstantiated claims have caused a bottleneck in the production and dissemination of GMOs into our food supply.

Though I am generally wary of corporate farming techniques, I do not believe that GMOs are a part of the problem. I want my food to be grown in an environment that closely resembles my home garden, so I would much rather eat a tomato whose genes resist pests than one that was covered in neurotoxic pesticides or broad based herbicides. I would rather the world have a steady supply of high yield corn than to let people starve over unscientific hysteria. I would rather my food production be highly regulated (as is mandated for GMOs) than to eat food that has never seen scientific scrutiny. I would rather help craft legislation that controls the industry than dismiss GMOs as a viable production method for my food. I am no friend to Monsanto, but neither do I support pseudoscientific fear-mongering. GMOs have a place in our modern society, and I fully support having them as a part of my food source.

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